What does ‘German-speaking’ mean?

What does ‘German-speaking’ mean?

German-speaking areas are increasingly becoming part of the national conversation.

The German population of France, Germany, the Netherlands, the UK and the United States grew from 5.7 million in 1950 to 13.4 million in 2015.

The country is now home to more than 2.5 million German-speakers.

The German-language population in the UK, which was 1.3 million by 2050, is now growing at about 4 per cent a year.

The rise in Germany’s population comes as the country struggles to contain its rapidly ageing population and is increasingly facing a shortage of labour.

The number of German-born people in the world is set to double to 13 million by 2060, according to the International Labour Organisation (ILO), which defines it as the “total population that is the most likely to be of a particular national or ethnic origin”.

But many of these migrants have chosen to settle in places such as the German-controlled German states of Baden-Württemberg, Rhineland-Palatinate and Saxony-Anhalt.

This influx has sparked fears about the quality of German culture.

In the city of Hamburg, for example, the number of people identifying themselves as German dropped to 3,000 in 2018.

And this year the number is set for a record low of 0,948.

Meanwhile, the rise in population is a problem for some Germans, who say that their cultural identity is being diluted.

Germany’s chancellor, Angela Merkel, has warned that she will not tolerate a rise in the number and diversity of its citizens.

Germany has always been the home of the ‘Germans’, the people who speak German, but there has been a growing shift to a new generation that is more culturally diverse, Ms Merkel said.

Many German-Americans are also moving to places like the US.

And the growing numbers of migrants and refugees who have made their way into Europe are contributing to a rise of anti-German sentiment.

The German language is considered to be a ‘universal language’ among Germans, and many have taken it for granted.

Its usage is not limited to everyday German-German words, but is also spoken in a wide range of languages, including Arabic, Hindi, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese, Russian and Turkish.

But Ms Merkel has also been criticised for failing to keep the country’s immigration policy in line with the growing influx of migrants.

She has also recently announced plans to close down the countrys biggest mosque, a place for Muslims to gather to pray and study.

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